37541052 – belchonock

It is not often that a court of law can issue a landmark opinion laden with profanity and sexual innuendos.  But last Friday, the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit seized the opportunity in a colorful decision holding the refusal of the United States Patent

Charlie Nelson Keever writes:

The Supreme Court ruled this morning that a federal law that prohibits the government from registering trademarks that “disparage” others violates the First Amendment.

Members of an Asian-American rock band filed a lawsuit after the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (PTO) kept the band from registering its name, The Slants, a

Just four days after the Actor Age Censorship Law (AB 1687) took effect on New Year’s Day, the controversial anti-age discrimination statute was forced to bear arms as IMDb, the world’s most popular entertainment database, took aim alleging the law infringes its right to free speech.  Since AB 1687 was passed last September, more than

Who would have thought a handful of textbooks purchased in Thailand and shipped to the U.S. would be the subject of repeated discussion at the United States Supreme Court?  Once again, Kirtsaeng v. John Wiley & Sons, involving the resale of textbooks, is heading to the U.S. high court.  In 2013, the Court decided

The recent Supreme Court ruling in Petrella v. MGM sent shockwaves through the copyright world—at least for those of us in the Ninth Circuit, where laches has long been available as an affirmative defense against purportedly stale claims. Indeed, this decision has already opened the door to a new (or old) crop of copyright infringement